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Internet Filtering

On 29 June 2010 by admin

ISP Filtering

Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy Senator Stephen Conroy has proposed legislation that will require Australian Internet Service Providers to prevent access to websites that have been refused classification under Australia’s censorship laws.

While this is a commendable aim, technologists advise that it will do little to address cyber safety concerns. Web filtering at the user level is still deemed indispensable, in the same way that parents must make judgements about the films, TV shows, video games and publications to which their children have access.

Compare internet content filters

The Australian Government undertook a detailed assessment process to provide Australian households with access to the best available filters through the National Filter Scheme.

All internet content filters previously available through the scheme were required to:

  • Block internet content determined to be prohibited by the Australian Communications and Media Authority
  • Be easy to install and use
  • Have technical support provided by the filter software supplier by:
    • Phone on 1800 880 176 (8am-10pm in your local time zone, for callers in Australia only. Free call for landline calls, usual charges
      apply to mobiles and payphones.)

       

    • Email anytime to be responded to within 24 hours
    • Questions & Answers on the suppliers website

Read more: http://www.netalert.gov.au/filters/Compare_internet_content_filters.html

Selecting a filter

In conjunction with parental supervision and household rules for internet use, filter software can be an effective tool for managing children’s access to the internet. There are a number of products available. Some are better than others at blocking particular types of content. The following information is provided as a guide to assist internet users in selecting a filter that meets their specific needs.

  • Filter types Different filters work in different ways. Some allow the user to access only a selected number of sites (‘whitelist’).
    Some prevent the user from accessing certain sites (‘blacklist’). Others analyse content as it is being accessed by the user. A number of
    products offer a combination of these features.

     

  • Whitelist filters are the most effective in blocking access to offensive and harmful material, but they also block a lot of material
    that may be innocuous. Such filters are likely to be appropriate for younger (primary school age) children, where protection from unsuitable
    material may be more important than having access to a wider range of content.

     

  • Blacklist filters provide access to a wider range of content, but may still allow access to some unsuitable material. Such
    filters are likely to suit families with older children, where having access to a wide range of content is an important consideration.

     

  • Multiple users Some products include the option of allowing different levels of filtering for different users. This may be useful
    where there are children of different ages in the family.

     

  • Monitoring filters that keep a record of visited sites can be useful for monitoring children’s access to the internet to see what
    sites they are visiting.

     

  • www, email, chat, newsgroups Some filters work only with internet content, while others can be used with a wider range of
    internet applications.

     

  • Updates To help ensure that your filter is as effective as possible, you may want to install a product that is updated
    automatically when you connect to the internet. Alternatively, your ISP may offer a filter that they administer and update for you.

     

  • ISP or user? Products that are installed on a home computer are likely to provide more flexibility in configuring the software to
    the user’s requirements. However, they may be more easily circumvented than a filter that is administered by an ISP.

Read more: http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_90167

 
 
 


Internet Filtering

On 29 June 2010 by admin

ISP Filtering

Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy Senator Stephen Conroy has proposed legislation that will require Australian Internet Service Providers to prevent access to websites that have been refused classification under Australia’s censorship laws.

While this is a commendable aim, technologists advise that it will do little to address cyber safety concerns. Web filtering at the user level is still deemed indispensable, in the same way that parents must make judgements about the films, TV shows, video games and publications to which their children have access.

Compare internet content filters

The Australian Government undertook a detailed assessment process to provide Australian households with access to the best available filters through the National Filter Scheme.

All internet content filters previously available through the scheme were required to:

  • Block internet content determined to be prohibited by the Australian Communications and Media Authority
  • Be easy to install and use
  • Have technical support provided by the filter software supplier by:
    • Phone on 1800 880 176 (8am-10pm in your local time zone, for callers in Australia only. Free call for landline calls, usual charges
      apply to mobiles and payphones.)

       

    • Email anytime to be responded to within 24 hours
    • Questions & Answers on the suppliers website

Read more: http://www.netalert.gov.au/filters/Compare_internet_content_filters.html

Selecting a filter

In conjunction with parental supervision and household rules for internet use, filter software can be an effective tool for managing children’s access to the internet. There are a number of products available. Some are better than others at blocking particular types of content. The following information is provided as a guide to assist internet users in selecting a filter that meets their specific needs.

  • Filter types Different filters work in different ways. Some allow the user to access only a selected number of sites (‘whitelist’).
    Some prevent the user from accessing certain sites (‘blacklist’). Others analyse content as it is being accessed by the user. A number of
    products offer a combination of these features.

     

  • Whitelist filters are the most effective in blocking access to offensive and harmful material, but they also block a lot of material
    that may be innocuous. Such filters are likely to be appropriate for younger (primary school age) children, where protection from unsuitable
    material may be more important than having access to a wider range of content.

     

  • Blacklist filters provide access to a wider range of content, but may still allow access to some unsuitable material. Such
    filters are likely to suit families with older children, where having access to a wide range of content is an important consideration.

     

  • Multiple users Some products include the option of allowing different levels of filtering for different users. This may be useful
    where there are children of different ages in the family.

     

  • Monitoring filters that keep a record of visited sites can be useful for monitoring children’s access to the internet to see what
    sites they are visiting.

     

  • www, email, chat, newsgroups Some filters work only with internet content, while others can be used with a wider range of
    internet applications.

     

  • Updates To help ensure that your filter is as effective as possible, you may want to install a product that is updated
    automatically when you connect to the internet. Alternatively, your ISP may offer a filter that they administer and update for you.

     

  • ISP or user? Products that are installed on a home computer are likely to provide more flexibility in configuring the software to
    the user’s requirements. However, they may be more easily circumvented than a filter that is administered by an ISP.

Read more: http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_90167